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Here's what to expect the day of the eclipse

(MGN Image)

When it comes to the total solar eclipse, emergency managers don't expect a major event, but they say you should still be prepared.

ABC15 News spoke with multiple agencies to find out what you can expect if you're looking from on land or watching from the water.

Best case scenario, there will be lots of traffic, delays and congestion on the road.

“No matter where you drive, you’re going to see some traffic. You’re going to have to expect traffic that day," said Sgt. Bob Beres with the South Carolina Highway Patrol.

You can expect crowds in the water too.

“It’s gonna get crowded. It’s gonna get congested. The boat ramps are going to get full. Go early. Be prepared. Make a day of it. Have fun," said Cpt. Ken Simmons with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

Worst case scenario, there will be all of that plus wrecks, people running out of gas and water. It’s a slim possibility but the director of emergency management for the entire state says he's ready just in case. He says they're used to lots of traffic.

“What we’re not used to, maybe, is having the magnitude of it affecting multiple areas of the state at one time," said Kim Stenson.

Up to 2 million are expected to be in the state for the eclipse. Up to 150,000 are expected to be in Georgetown County.

Front Street will be closed from 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Emergency Operations Center will not be activated unless something happens.

“But we will have the fire department and law enforcement. They will be enforced. We’re going to have extra people out on the road ways and on the water,” said Cindy Grace with Georgetown Co. Emergency Mgt.

There's a different story in Horry County. The emergency management director there doesn’t think there will be heavy traffic, even on Highway 17.

“I think the most traffic flow problems we may encounter, if any, would be after the eclipse is over and everyone is leaving at the same time coming back from out of Georgetown county," said Randy Webster with Horry County Emergency Management.

But, hopefully the traffic won’t eclipse what could be a fun day.


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