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      Tourists and produce drenched by rain

      The summer of 2013 will likely be remembered for being very wet. Last year our area was in a drought, but now we're dealing with the other extreme, an excessive amount of rain.

      Friday morning heavy rain and a broken traffic signal slowed down drivers at the intersection of Highway 378 and 501 in Conway. It's yet another day of wet weather in an area used to sunny skies.

      Along the boardwalk in Myrtle Beach, the normal crowds weren't there. And the beach was nearly empty.

      Gene Buehler is in town from Memphis Tennessee, "last night on the way here I got my phone and I looked at the weather and said 'aww no, we picked the wrong weekend to come here' but you know it's still beautiful."

      Even though it's not ideal beach weather some are making the most of it by donning two pieces and playing in the sand. A few blocks away at Myrtle's Market, (https://www.facebook.com/myrtlesmarket ) it's not very busy since they depend on tourists stopping by.

      "Everybody is pretty much staying inside then later in the day they'll come out a little bit later that's why we're open until six. Hopefully we'll catch that late crowd," said Johnny Graham.

      There are fruit and veggies for sale but the days and days on end of rain is having a negative effect on crops.

      "It slows down the crops because they can't take but so much water. Then the crops that does keep growing it grows too fast and it just fills up with water and it just steals the flavor away from it," explained Graham.

      At his farm, the only thing Graham can do is trench the water off so the produce isn't sitting in water.

      "The watermelons will take a beating if it keeps raining like this. The watermelons will take a beating and start rotting in the field because we can't get them out fast enough. We definitely gonna lose squash and zucchini if it keeps raining. Tomatoes are pretty much off of the ground so, and we can keep the water off of them so we'll be all right on the tomatoes," added Graham.

      Like many others Graham hopes the rain will stop for the sake of his crops and business.