85
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      Residental sewage problem backing up onto school property

      A sewage backup at Westover Mobile Home Park in Lake City is now making its way onto the property of J. Paul Truluck Middle School.

      Students don't play in the area where the sewage has spilled onto the property.

      Residents say they've complained for nearly six months, and no one seems to be listening.

      "We complain about it to the mayor, landlords. Everything goes back to the city. Then it goes back to the landlords. Nobody has an idea on what to do," said Charles Green, resident.

      Ann Graham said, "We've complained to the mayor. DHEC has been out here.We've also complained to everybody that we know to complain to. Nobody's fixing it. Nothing's getting done. It's just getting worse."

      The mobile home park's owner said a collapsed sewer line is to blame.

      She said the city put in the sewer lines more than 30 years ago, and there was an agreement for the city to maintain and replace the lines.

      The owner added it's the city's responsibility to fix the broken sewer lines.

      Lake City Public Works Director Rickey Simms said Westover Mobile Home Park has its own sewer system and it's the park owner's responsibility.

      We contacted the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control about the matter.

      They released a statement on the matter.

      "The initial complaint made to us appeared to have been related to a septic tank. An investigation determined the cause to be a sewer system instead. Further review found that the sewer line was privately owned -- not owned by Lake City. We will direct the owner to repair the line satisfactorily.

      "A bypass pump has been installed as a temporary repair. Our staff will be visiting the scene to provide follow up," said Jim Beasley, DHEC.

      Some residents say they hope something is done and soon.

      The park's owner says she's in the process of selling the property.

      She said she initially wanted to shut down the park after the sewage problems, but residents begged her to keep it open, saying they had been living there for more than 20 years.