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      Hurricane lane reversal plan to be tested Tuesday

      Lane reversal plans will be tested later this week by the South Carolina Department Public Safety and other agencies as part of preparation for Hurricane season.

      There will be no actual lane reversals during the tests that will be conducted on Tuesday for all three major coastal areas of the state.

      Personnel and equipment will be deployed as part of this test.

      According to a SC DPC news release, the exercise should not interfere with the flow of traffic and no intersections will not be blocked. But the Highway Patrol is asking those traveling on I-26, U.S. 501, and S.C. 544 and U.S. 278 and U.S. 21 to be cautious and aware that law enforcement officers and state personnel will be located on the shoulder of the highway and at exits.

      The exercise will last from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on June 3.

      In the Myrtle Beach area, traffic control equipment and personnel will be stationed on U.S. 501 beginning at S.C. 544 and ending at U.S. 378, as well as between S.C. 22 and the Marion By-Pass.

      Aerial units from SLED, the Civil Air Patrol, the South Carolina National Guard, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and the South Carolina Forestry Commission could also be in the area flying assigned aerial surveillance routes.

      And that's not the only area Hurricane exercise this week.

      Georgetown County will be conducting a full-scale hurricane preparedness exercise from today, June 2, through Thursday, June 5.

      The scenario for the Georgetown exercise involves landfall of a Category 3 hurricane near Charleston, causing devastation to Georgetown County, including destruction of the bridges linking the Waccamaw Neck to the City of Georgetown, according to a news release from Georgetown County.

      F-16s will be in the area for damage assessment, as well as a C-130 cargo plane and SC-HART's Blackhawk helicopters. The scenario is also expected to include a simulated chemical spill just outside Georgetown, giving emergency responders a chance to test hazmat skills, the release said.