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Horry County teachers are flipping their classrooms

Some Horry County school teachers are hearing fewer excuses from students that they can't do their homework.

It's because a new teaching method has students doing their homework during school hours.

Flipping the classrooms means students watch short lessons at home and then work on examples in the classroom.

Jan Hucks, a teacher at Carolina Forest High School, has been teaching math for as long as she can remember. She tried this new teaching method for the first time this year.

"I flip the classrooms. What happens is I make a video, more like a podcast," she said. "They can't see me, they can hear me and see what I am writing."

The program is Educreations and is one both students and teachers can access. Students are given log in information and can watch the videos a teacher posts.

"I thought it was the craziest idea when I first heard about it," said Hucks. "Then I decided, 'Oh what the heck,' and I love it. I've been really excited about teaching for the first time in a long time."

She says her A.P. Calculus students are also excited about the new way of learning.

"Before it was I don't want to go home do these questions, maybe do half them and get a 50. But this is making me really wanting to go home and do my work," said Markell Allen, a senior at Carolina Forest High School.

Allen takes Mrs. Hucks' A.P. Calculus class. He understands not all the students are used to the new teaching method, but he hopes everyone in his class will catch on sooner rather than later.

"You have to buy into it. You have to watch the videos every night, take notes," he said. "If you don't, you're not gonna know it and miss the lesson. That's basically missing a day. And it doesn't work if that happens."

Mrs. Hucks and another math teacher from Carolina Forest High School presented the Flip the Class method to the Horry County School Board Monday night.

"Math can be intimidating, so anything we can do to empower kids to be better in math is wonderful," said Karen McIlath, an Horry County school board member. "We have a pocket of excellence here with flipping the classes, so it's a matter of getting other teachers interested in trying this."

Mrs. Hucks says wants to encourage those other teachers to give it a shot. She says she can see how it is benefiting her students and knows it can help with some other students as well.

"When they are at home doing homework, I can't help them," said Hucks. "They get stuck and they get frustrated. Well now it's, if they get stuck, it's come here, come here. And I sit right with them and talk with them through the whole problem."

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