81 / 66
      78 / 61
      73 / 58

      Highway Patrol sees increase in mopeds on the roads

      South Carolina Highway Patrol says they're seeing a rise in the number of mopeds on the road in South Carolina and as a result, more moped crashes.

      Mopeds can legally travel on any road in South Carolina but they are limited to 25 miles per hour.

      Bill Boggs, owner of BJ's Scooters sells, rents and repairs mopeds on Kings Highway in Myrtle Beach. There has been a rise in mopeds on the road according to Boggs, as well.

      "Business is good. This last week we've sold almost 20 bikes," said Boggs.

      Boggs says he sells to many people that have DUI's because although they can't drive a car with a suspended license, they can operate a moped. However, Boggs says he also has another line of customers.

      "I think they're the future for people who are on fixed incomes, I mean you get 100 miles to a gallon on one and they generally cost less than a thousand dollars to purchase one," said Boggs.

      The South Carolina Highway Patrol made a booklet for all police that outlines rules and regulations for mopeds in the state.

      Speed, size and license regulations are just a few things included.

      Some regulations inside the booklet need to change, according to Boggs.

      "They're allowing these mopeds on 501 and the business and Bypass 17, and if you're on a 45 mile an hour road, the road says you can only go 25 miles an hour regardless of what your bike can go, so I think they need to change the laws," said Boggs.

      Both highway patrol and Boggs encourage everyone to use caution on the roads to keep more people safe.

      "The dangers are if you're not paying attention... you could have the same dangers in a car that you have on bikes. The main thing is keep your distance and make sure all your lights are working," said Boggs.

      Highway Patrol says the difficult thing for car drivers is being able to tell the difference between mopeds and motorcycles when it's dark out.

      Highway Patrol recommends to be cautious about every taillight they see, in order to prevent more crashes.