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      Disabled man's family fights off foreclosure

      A family struggling with a loved one's health has won a battle with a bank foreclosing on a newly disabled man's home.

      On March 2, 2012, 28-year-old Jaymes Draper crashed his motorcycle, leaving him brain damaged and paralyzed from the waist down.

      "It was about seven o'clock and the nurse surgeon came in and told me he didn't know if he was going to live," said Jayme's father Jim Draper.

      Jaymes lives at his home in Loris but before his injury, like many during this recession, he tried to restructure his home mortgage.

      Since the injury and with the bank threatening foreclosure, Jim, 79, decided to take over the bills to save his son's home.

      "This was his first home," said Jim. "I'm trying to do my best to keep it."

      But recently Jim's best wasn't enough.

      "My brother went down to the Bank of America made two payments, and they were fine," Jaymes' aunt Darlene Brown said. "He went to make the third payment, and they rejected it. No we're not accepting it. They wouldn't tell him why. They wouldn't tell him anything. Nothing at all."

      Jim battled with the bank for more than eight months, and the family was at its wit's end.

      "I picked up the phone book and started to call and you guys have helped us immensely."

      After hearing the Draper's story, Newschannel 15 called Bank of America to see if they would take a look at the family's loan.

      Several calls and correspondence were exchange and before the bank got back with us about the Draper's loan status, the bank's administration called Jim with a new loan agreement.

      "Things really started moving once you got involved," Jim said. "With all this going on, I've been stressed real bad at times. I feel a whole lot better than I did."

      "We really appreciate everything you did for us," Brown said. "I don't know what you said to those people at Bank of America but it got through to them. And that's all that really matters."

      Jaymes' condition is improving, and the family says their next obstacle is finding the time and money to put him through the necessary physical therapy.

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