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      Aynor family blames busy beavers for flooding

      Image taken from a home video showing the flooding that Joanie Mills says is caused by the beaver dams.

      A family in Aynor is dealing with some major flooding around their home on Valley Forge Road, and they say the culprit is a series of beaver dams on their neighbor's property.

      They've reached out to the state and the county for help and when they didn't get answers, they contacted WPDE.

      Joanie and Darrell Mills say every time it rains, they get a sea of water in their yard.

      "The water was up to my waist because it just has no place to go. Like I said the entire yard was flooded, it comes up three, four feet up to the house," Joanie Mills explained.

      One of their cars was ruined, all the contents in their storage shed were destroyed and the Mills are also dealing with backed up sewage.

      "It makes the sewage actually back out into the yard from the septic tank because there's just no place for anything to go," Mills said.

      The wet mess is all because of some beaver dams on their neighbor's property, according to Mills. She said all the water that would normally travel down stream was being blocked at the dams.

      When we reached out to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, First Sergeant Nate Hutson told us beaver dam removal would be the responsibility of owner of the property where the dam is located.

      "First thing you could do is call a nuisance wildlife operator and what they would do is come out and assess the problem," Hutson explained, adding that the landowner isn't legally obligated to do anything.

      But, the property owner is not legally bound to remove it. The woman who owns the land told us she has no plans to remove the dams.

      So, the only other thing the Mills can do is hope for the rains to let up.

      If you have a problem with beaver dams on your property, Hutson says it is legal to hunt them during the day all year long in South Carolina with a valid hunting license.

      The normal trapping season for licensed trappers is December 1st to March 1st. But a land owner can get a permit to trap outside of season by contacting DNR.

      For more on what a land owner can do when dealing with beavers, visit the DNR Beaver Control page.