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      High school bomb threat suspects will spend holidays in custody

      Two juveniles, charged this week making bomb threats, will spend the holidays in the custody of the Department of Juvenile Justice.

      On Monday, Horry County police charged a 16-year-old North Myrtle Beach High School student with Conveying False Information regarding the Use of a Destructive Device following a bomb threat at the school.

      On Tuesday, Myrtle Beach police charged a 15-year-old Myrtle Beach High School student with the same thing after a note was found in the boys' bathroom.

      The note stated there were explosive devices at Myrtle Beach High School, Myrtle Beach Middle School, and Myrtle Beach Intermediate School.

      Both students were in an Horry County courtroom Wednesday.

      The North Myrtle Beach High student pleaded guilty and was committed to DJJ for an amount of time not to exceed his 21st birthday. His sentence was suspended to 14 days in DJJ custody with nine months probation, according to Assistant Solicitor Mike Freeman.

      The North Myrtle Beach High student will have to meet requirements during his probation, such as alcohol and drug assessments, said Freeman.

      The Myrtle Beach High student requested a new attorney and is scheduled back in court on January 3rd. The student will remain in DJJ custody until his hearing, Freeman added.

      "In lieu of the most recent events in Connecticut, it really makes you angry that they would make such foolish threats," said Horry County Solicitor Jimmy Richardson.

      The statute for the charge carries a maximum 10 year sentence.

      But with juveniles, a sentence that long is not likely and most will likely spend 14-45 days in jail, said Richardson.

      "We're going to ask for active time regardless of the circumstances, regardless if the kid had any intent, regardless of it was a prank, a bet, a dare. Any of that it doesn't matter to me," said Richardson.

      He believes even a little time in DJJ will have an impact.

      "Those other kids that just shot someone, they're not going to be overly impressed with the fact that you pulled a fire alarm or that you left a note in the bathroom," said Richardson. "You're not going to be the cool kid at DJJ."